"Students say teaching is very good as a result of individual tuition and small group sizes."

Ofsted 2014

Admissions and Applications

 

Our admissions process kick-starts in November, with our Year 11 students receiving information in assembly from our Curriculum Leaders, Careers Adviser, and Head of Sixth Form. Following this, all students from within and outside of Desborough are warmly invited to our Sixth Form Open Evening, taking place this year on Thursday 25th January 2018.

Following our Open Evening, applications can then be made, and interviews to determine course suitability will be conducted.

Any external students wishing to make an application to Desborough College’s Sixth Form, should download and complete an application form from the link below, returning it to the school for the attention of Mr D Clawson, Assistant Principal/Head of Sixth Form. Completed applications can also be returned via email to: sixthformadmin@desborough-college.net

Successful applicants should expect to receive a conditional offer letter before the Easter holidays, outlining clearly the conditions that will need to be met for entry, along with an invitation to a Sixth Form Taster Day, taking place in June.

On GCSE results day, Sixth Form staff will be available in the Sixth Form Centre to adjust offers (where possible), should any entry requirements not be met, or should a student wish to amend their choices. 

Entry Requirements

External application form

Internal application form

 

This year's 6th Form Open Evening will be Thursday, 25th January 2018

 

 

SIXTH FORM OPEN EVENING 2017


PRINCIPAL’S SPEECH

In keeping with previous years I have decided to make available, in its entirety, the presentation that I made at the recent Sixth-Form Open Evening.

Good Evening. Welcome to Desborough College; it's lovely to see so many familiar faces and equally pleasing to see so many new ones.

Those of you who have attended previous events where I am required to speak publicly in front of an audience will know that I am not fond of the experience and that I tend to keep my speeches short and to the point. Those of you who haven't heard me deliver a speech before are about to discover why.

I shall let some facts and figures do my talking shortly, but before I do I need to be candid with you and share some information about what young people can and cannot expect to find at Desborough College if they choose to join our sixth-form.

Do not expect to find a pool table, a table-tennis table, a pin-ball machine, bar- billiards, table-football, card schools, a snooker table, video-games machines, carpet bowls or a room where you can listen to loud music. We haven't got any of them. We used to have some of them but decided that they were a distraction away from the real business of sixth-form which is, of course, study. So if you want to develop your 3-card brag skills or polish your cueing action then Desborough is probably not for you.
 

If you want a sixth-form smoking area or permission to stand at the front gates while you indulge your nicotine habit then Desborough College isn't for you. We are a school, not a sixth-form college. We have pupils on site as young as eleven and I expect my sixth-formers to act responsibly and maturely because, whether they like it or not, they are role-models.
 

If you want to come to school wearing the type of clothing that would grace the dance-floor of the local night club or earn you gasps of admiration from the audience at a Guns n Roses Concert then Desborough College is not for you. I expect my sixth-formers to arrive at school smartly dressed in a business suit, their working
clothes.
 

If you want a sixth-form social area with plush leatherette seating, a Juke box and a coffee bar where you can drink skinny lattes in your free periods then Desborough College is not for you. For one simple reason: nobody at Desborough College has free periods. They have study periods!
 

If you want a sixth-form with hundreds of students, many of whom you will never say so much as hello to during the entire two years of your study then Desborough College is not for you. We are a small sixth-form and we like it that way. None of my sixth-formers feel overlooked or anonymous or marginalised because they are not outgoing or gregarious. They are all special, valued individuals and we get to know them speedily because they are small in number.
 

I've given you plenty of reasons why Desborough College may be the wrong choice for you.
 

Now, I'm going to give you one reason, and one reason only, why Desborough College might be the right place for you: it's the outstanding quality of the teaching, whether you are taking all of your qualifications here or some here and some at Newlands Girls where the teaching is also outstanding. I've chosen the single most important criterion for selecting a particular sixth-form to study because sixth-formshould be seen primarily as a stepping stone into the university of your choice or work in a career of your choice. If you don't get the grades necessary to realise your ambitions then you've wasted, wasted two years and the single most decisive factor in achieving successful examination outcomes is the quality of teaching.
 

How do I know that the quality of teaching at Desborough College is outstanding? Because Ofsted tell me. They use something called the L3VA tool to measure the progress that sixth-formers make from Year 11 to Year 13, from their GCSE results to their A Level results.

These figures which can be found on the DfE school performance web-site tell you how much progress students who studied A levels at this school made between the end of key stage 4 and the end of their A level studies, compared to similar students across England.

The scores are calculated by comparing the A-level results of students at this school with the A level results of students in schools and colleges across England who started with similar results at the end of the previous key stage – key stage 4.
 

A score above zero means students made more progress, on average, than students across England who got similar results at the end of key stage 4 in their GCSE’s.
 

A score below zero means students made less progress, on average, than students across England who got similar results at the end of key stage 4
 

So there you have it: Desborough College last year finished second of twelve local schools and colleges when the progress that the students made over their two years of A level study was measured. A compelling reason for choosing Desborough College.
 

Those of you that know me will appreciate the depths of my disappointment at finishing second and should not be surprised to learn of my determination to finish next year and every year thereafter at the top of this particular pile.

P Frazer